THEORETICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL STUDY FOR CONTROLLING VIBRATION OF A PARTICULAR SYSTEM USING TUNED DAMPER

Abstract

are accomplished in many application areas, such as in automobiles, aircrafts, helicopters, machines...etc., vibration may cause systems failure or reduce their performance. This paper studies the experimental and theoretical control of vibration using a developed tuned damper (based on variable piston area ( to provide optimal vibration reduction at different conditions. The experimental work was carried out on a particular system, which mainly composes of beam, harmonic excitation source (exciter), passive spring and tuned damper. Also, the system is provided by an electronics system to acquire the sensor signal and drive the damper according to control algorithm. The neural network system identification (NNSI) was utilized to identify all system components as one model based on the inputs - output data that is collected from the experiment. In addition, the mathematical model of the system was derived and used with experimental damping ratio at different damper piston angles (0-60) to verify the experimental results. The implemented controller is a model predictive controller (MPC), which was designed based on NNSI in MATLAB Toolbox to control the system vibration. The MPC explicitly handles the measurable disturbance (excitation frequency) of the predictive model. The results showed that the model predictive controller with a semi-active tuned damper is effectively reduced the root mean square (RMS) of acceleration in the resonance region in which the maximum time of vibration reduction from higher RMS to minimum level is 1.39 second. The experimental and theoretical works are relatively converged and the total range of percentage error between the experimental and theoretical RMS of acceleration at resonance is (4.9-10) %.