Human Chorionic Gonadotropin and Testosterone in Normal and Preeclamptic Pregnancies in Relation to Fetal Gender

Abstract

AbstractBackground: Preeclampsia-eclampsia is still one of the leading causes of maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. Despite active research for many years, the etiology of this disorder exclusive to human pregnancy is an enigma. Objective: To evaluate the effect of fetal gender on serum human chorionic gonadotropin and testosterone in normotensive and preeclamptic pregnancies.Patients and Methods: A-case control study was conducted in AL-Kadhymia Teaching Hospital from May 2008 through March 2009. The sample consists of eighty women with singleton pregnancies. Forty pregnancies were complicated by mild preeclampsia; twenty male and twenty female fetuses. Forty pregnancies were uncomplicated; twenty male and twenty female fetuses. Maternal serum human chorionic gonadotropin and total testosterone were measured.Results: In preeclamptic pregnancies with genders, maternal human gonadotropin and testosterone serum levels were significantly higher than normotensive mothers. In uncomplicated pregnancies with female fetuses, the maternal serum human chorionic gonadotropin was significantly higher than those with male fetuses (P value = 0.0008) whereas no significant gender difference was found in preeclamptic group. Male-bearing preeclamptic pregnancies had significantly higher maternal serum testosterone levels than female-bearing pregnancies complicated by preeclampsia (P value = 0.00226).Conclusion: In preeclamptic pregnancies with either gender, both the maternal serum human chorionic gonadotropin and testosterone levels were significantly higher than in uncomplicated pregnancies.